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Monday, March 20, 2006

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Honours (Prevention of Abuses) Act, 1925

Written answers Thursday, 26 January 2006

Norman Baker (Lewes, LDem) Hansard source
To ask the Prime Minister whether he plans to (a) review and (b) reform the Honours (Prevention of Abuses) Act 1925.

Tony Blair (Prime Minister) Hansard source "No".

The sale of British titles is prohibited by the Honours (Prevention of Abuses) Act, 1925

The Honours (Prevention of Abuses) Act 1925 was passed on the recommendation of the Royal Commission on Honours, which reported in 1922

Section 1(1) of the Act provides that: "If any person accepts, obtains or agrees to accept or obtain from any person, for himself or for any other person, or for any purpose, any gift, money or valuable consideration as an inducement or reward for procuring or assisting or endeavouring to procure the grant of a dignity or title of honour to any person or otherwise in connection with such a grant, he shall be guilty of a misdemeanour."

Section 1(2) If any person gives, or agrees or proposes to give, or offers to any person any gift, money or valuable consideration as an inducement or reward for procuring or assisting or endeavouring to procure the grant of a dignity or title of honour to any person, or otherwise in connection with such a grant, he shall be guilty of an offence.

Section 1(3) provided that anyone found guilty under the Act could be liable on conviction on indictment to a maximum of two years imprison-ment

Why not write to your MP and urge them to sign Early Day Motion 1604

The common law offence of misconduct in a public office was defined in Russell On Crime, 12th Edition (1964) (J W Cecil Turner) in this way:

"Where a public officer is guilty of misbehaviour in office by neglecting a duty imposed upon him either at common law or by statute, he commits a misdemeanour and is liable to indictment unless another remedy is substituted by statute. The liability exists whether he is a common law or a statutory officer; and a person holding an office of important trust and of consequence to the public, under letters patent or derivatively from such authority, is liable to indictment for not faithfully discharging the office."
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